Author Topic: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup  (Read 7172 times)

September 23, 2020, 05:27:53 pm

TukendorfTDI

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1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« on: September 23, 2020, 05:27:53 pm »
Hey folks!

New here, and relatively new to the TDI and swapping world (but not necessarily new mechanics or diesel engines)

I'm looking at building an M-TDI for a Toyota pickup swap, haven't found a truck yet but will ideally be pulling a 22re and mounting it to a stock w56 transmission and re-gearing the axles. I am definitely not looking to do anything too crazy with this build, just something more comparable or slightly better than the stock 22re at 115hp and 140ft/lbs.

I may have a line on a 1Z/AHU engine out of a 1997 VW, and am told will be sold with a mechanical pump... for a very reasonable price I might add!
I'm hoping to get anywhere north of stock 22re specs. My thoughts are to have the mechanical pump built for the application, maybe go with some larger nozzles, intercooler (any suggestions?), and the stock turbo (should be K03?), does this justify head studs?. I would like to get rid of the ECU, fully mechanical, and run the truck from the starter and fuel shut off solenoid. This being the reason I went with the 1Z/AHU rather than ALH. Now with the ECU deleted I should have no issues just getting rid of all sensors and just plugging the associated voids?

At this point I am hoping to get a good understanding of two things:

1. Whether my plans are achievable, and if you have any suggestions don't hesitate to throw them out
2. If there is anything I'm missing, is incorrect, or anything I overlooked, please let me know

Please know, my goals here are simply to break it down to the basics!



Reply #1September 23, 2020, 11:23:20 pm

libbydiesel

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2020, 11:23:20 pm »
The ALH can be run with a mechanic pump in the same way that an AHU can.  I've run both.  ALH is a stronger block and a better design but the AHU would work well also. 

Your plans are easily achievable with the right pump.  I recently purchased a small lot of brand new Bosch pumps that are perfect for mTDI pumps.  PM for details if interested. 

Reply #2September 24, 2020, 12:58:55 am

TukendorfTDI

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2020, 12:58:55 am »
Sounds great, thanks for the reply.

Would the turbo on the ALH be different than the AHU? From what I have read, the AHU has a wastegate actuator, and the ALH would be VNT. I am really impartial on the engine I swap, I had decided recently on the AHU due to the price of the engine and mechanical pump I have been offered. After further reading I decided with those factors, as well as the differences in turbos, that it may be easier and more cost effective to go with the AHU.

Aside from that, do you have any nozzle and/or intercooler suggestions?

Reply #3September 24, 2020, 01:42:15 pm

libbydiesel

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2020, 01:42:15 pm »
As you say, the ALH turbo is VNT (and computer controlled) and the AHU/1Z turbo is wastegated.  However, the very small wastegated turbo that came fitted stock to the AHU/1Z engines is not well sized for tuning much above stock so the turbo might not be a good reason to go with one engine over the other.  Any of the 8V exhaust manifolds/turbos will fit either engine.  There are quite a few turbo choices that can be fitted using an adapter plate.  Some people (myself included) have created mechanical vane controls for the VNT turbos.  Others have gone with a standalone electronic control for the turbo vanes.     

Kerma TDI has good descriptions of various nozzles and the performance you can expect from them.

A water to air intercooler system that is well designed will outperform an air to air system with the cost of added complexity/components.  FrozenBoost has an array to choose from of either style.  Intercooler choice would depend heavily on where you would like to place it on the vehicle.  Minimizing the boosted volume is a good idea.  Maximizing the cooling effect is also a good idea.  Balancing the two depends on what you can fit and where on the vehicle.   

Reply #4September 27, 2020, 11:23:59 am

Chuck1978

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2020, 11:23:59 am »
  I recently purchased a small lot of brand new Bosch pumps that are perfect for mTDI pumps.  PM for details if interested.

Oh really?!?  I've got two mTDI pumps here from a Kia 2.9L TDI and a Land Rover, but this is great news and of interest to me.  11mm heads?

Reply #5September 27, 2020, 11:46:15 am

Chuck1978

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2020, 11:46:15 am »
I'm looking at building an M-TDI for a Toyota pickup swap, haven't found a truck yet but will ideally be pulling a 22re and mounting it to a stock w56 transmission and re-gearing the axles. I am definitely not looking to do anything too crazy with this build, just something more comparable or slightly better than the stock 22re at 115hp and 140ft/lbs.

I may have a line on a 1Z/AHU engine out of a 1997 VW, and am told will be sold with a mechanical pump... for a very reasonable price I might add!
I'm hoping to get anywhere north of stock 22re specs. My thoughts are to have the mechanical pump built for the application, maybe go with some larger nozzles, intercooler (any suggestions?), and the stock turbo (should be K03?), does this justify head studs?. I would like to get rid of the ECU, fully mechanical, and run the truck from the starter and fuel shut off solenoid. This being the reason I went with the 1Z/AHU rather than ALH. Now with the ECU deleted I should have no issues just getting rid of all sensors and just plugging the associated voids?


Are you looking for a solid axle front end Toyota, or possibly a solid axle swap?  If so, the AHU or 1Z is definitely a better fit as far as front differential and high steer clearance. 

The ALH block is stronger and the block alloy benefits in longer wear life in the cylinder bores, but you won't break either block, 1Z/AHU or ALH.  The connecting rods are the only real concern if you plan to keep a small turbo for the instant throttle response and low rpm boost, but plan to up the fueling and install larger injector nozzles.  The stock rods will hold 180hp-200hp and 250-270ft-lbs people will tell you, but that is by using a larger turbo which will not be building much of any boost at lower rpm's. The stock rods are capable of those power figures at higher rpm, but low rpm torque increases under heavier loads with more low rpm boost and fueling, and you are putting it into the danger zone as far as the stock rods are concerned.  Forged aftermarket rods are definitely a plus, or upgrading to the best choice of newer pistons from a 2004+ engine which are made for the trapezoidal topped rods, also referred to as "cracked rods" due to the manufacturing process.  these are much stronger, but you have to make sure when shopping that you are looking at rods from engines which use the same big end rod crank bearing journal size.  The BHW and PD150 etc have a larger big end bearing journal than the ALH and AHU/1Z.
Head studs are a great idea for extra insurance, always, when trying to achieve more power.

Yes the ALH has a VNT turbo, you you can run those with an electronic controller and throttle position sensor (EGR model Land Rover TDI pumps have a throttle position sensor add-on).  Some people have even rigged up a mechanical actuator cable for the VNT actuator that is controlled from a mechanical actuator on the accelerator pedal...
Myself, I am a fan of the ALH with a wastegate turbo still...


Stock TDI engines in the mechanical conversion range make I believe 90hp and 150ft-lbs.  With a bit more boost and fueling, a healthy used engine, and proper tuning, you can easily get 110-125hp and 180-220ft-lbs, and come close to double the fuel mpg and fuel tank mileage range vs the stock 22R...

The Bosio-Fratelli DLC1019 Next Gen injector nozzles are my top choice when looking for significant power gains but still desiring a fair amount of fuel economy.  The PP546 are the go-to for bigger power, but they will be more prone to some smoking under load and moderate acceleration, and a slight edge taken off of the efficiency of the engine due to the spray pattern with it's larger orifices.  The PP520 are also great, just a small step down from the DLC1019 Next Gen. 
You can get the 520 and others in an older version that is not DLC coated, DLC is a diamond-hardness coating that allows the nozzles to have a significantly longer wear lifespan, so it is a good idea for the long term. 

Also you can look into a K03 hybrid using the diesel exhaust side and a K03 VW gas engine compressor side for a slightly larger compressor wheel and more boost.  That's referred to as the K03/K03 hybrid.  I have also heard of a K03/K04 hybrid, but I have no details on that.  Some people don't care for mixing and matching of parts to build hybrid turbos, but others praise it.  The AAZ 1.9TD's version of the K14 turbo may be the best overall of the old school wastegated turbos.  With enough fuelling, it will have almost no lag, and it is capable of 16-17psi continuous boosting with an intercooler with no problems, with some reporting they occasionally hit up to 23psi intercooled with gains to be had, but also while monitoring the Exhaust Gas Temp gauge and not holding the pedal to the floor in this boost range for long periods.  The K03 is said to only be good for up to around 13psi boost stock with the diesel compressor, but the diesel turbine side gives practically INSTANT boost, so this is great for low end torque.  Refer to my comments about the connecting rods and excessive low end torque tuning...

Reply #6September 27, 2020, 11:58:28 am

Chuck1978

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2020, 11:58:28 am »
Also, if you can get the Bosch and VW numbers off of the mechanical pump that comes with this 1997 AHU engine, that would be very important to know.  If it is the common mTDI Land Rover pump, you are doing GREAT....
If it is a pump sold in the aftermarket by Hans Auto Parts aka Pete Rothenbacher aka PRothe, beware... send it off for a full rebuild and replacement of any internal parts that could fail. 
Also, a lot of people use the old IDI turbodiesel VW injection pumps from the 1.6TD and 1.9TD engines, and bolt them onto the AHU/1Z TDI engines.  They will fit, and they will run, but the internal components are not right, the dynamic timing parts are not right and cannot be swapped from the electronic TDI pumps as those are computer controlled, and also the main shafts are 17mm vs 20mm, and have been known to shear in half from the added pressure requirements of the TDI engines especially when trying to make stock or more than stock TDI power.

Post the numbers off of the Bosch pump so we can see what you have.  The Bosch numbers will start out as 0 460 414 ### or 404 or 494.  If it is a 414, you are probably pretty lucky and have a Rover or other Euro application 11mm pump.  Some Cummins pumps and a LT2.8 VW had 12mm pump heads, that will be a 424. old IDI pumps will be a 494, 9mm pump head, not really suitable for a "good running" and pleasing TDI mechanical conversion. 

Pump numbers are on a pad on the side of the pump, I believe oriented vertically iirc. Some are stamped pretty lightly, some are stamped very deeply, others have an ID plate affixed to this location.




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« Last Edit: September 27, 2020, 12:13:48 pm by Chuck1978 »

Reply #7November 08, 2020, 07:55:50 pm

TukendorfTDI

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2020, 07:55:50 pm »

[/quote]

Are you looking for a solid axle front end Toyota, or possibly a solid axle swap?  If so, the AHU or 1Z is definitely a better fit as far as front differential and high steer clearance. 

The ALH block is stronger and the block alloy benefits in longer wear life in the cylinder bores, but you won't break either block, 1Z/AHU or ALH.  The connecting rods are the only real concern if you plan to keep a small turbo for the instant throttle response and low rpm boost, but plan to up the fueling and install larger injector nozzles.  The stock rods will hold 180hp-200hp and 250-270ft-lbs people will tell you, but that is by using a larger turbo which will not be building much of any boost at lower rpm's. The stock rods are capable of those power figures at higher rpm, but low rpm torque increases under heavier loads with more low rpm boost and fueling, and you are putting it into the danger zone as far as the stock rods are concerned.  Forged aftermarket rods are definitely a plus, or upgrading to the best choice of newer pistons from a 2004+ engine which are made for the trapezoidal topped rods, also referred to as "cracked rods" due to the manufacturing process.  these are much stronger, but you have to make sure when shopping that you are looking at rods from engines which use the same big end rod crank bearing journal size.  The BHW and PD150 etc have a larger big end bearing journal than the ALH and AHU/1Z.
Head studs are a great idea for extra insurance, always, when trying to achieve more power.

Yes the ALH has a VNT turbo, you you can run those with an electronic controller and throttle position sensor (EGR model Land Rover TDI pumps have a throttle position sensor add-on).  Some people have even rigged up a mechanical actuator cable for the VNT actuator that is controlled from a mechanical actuator on the accelerator pedal...
Myself, I am a fan of the ALH with a wastegate turbo still...


Stock TDI engines in the mechanical conversion range make I believe 90hp and 150ft-lbs.  With a bit more boost and fueling, a healthy used engine, and proper tuning, you can easily get 110-125hp and 180-220ft-lbs, and come close to double the fuel mpg and fuel tank mileage range vs the stock 22R...




[/quote]

So, I picked up the engine, upon further investigation I believe it is an AAZ, and the fella I bought it off didn't quite know the history of the engine! I can post pictures of the pump number tomorrow but believe it is stock VW. Has the stock K03 turbo. It was cheap and will be a good place to start learning about VW diesels, but I don't think I'll put it in my pickup.

Thanks greatly for all the help, I didn't realize the 1Z/AHU engine would provide more clearance. The truck will one way or another have a solid axle up front so thats awesome to know. I am really hoping to go the ALH route with a K03/K04 turbo, and am still unsure about the pump. As for the solid axle and ALH clearance, I had planned on putting a few inches of lift onto of the axles, so hopefully that would resolve any issues.

I was on the Kerma website looking at the K03/K04 hybrid turbo and it was stated that it will not fit on the Canadian AHU engine, so is it safe to say that it would not fit on the Canadian ALH engine? Probably best to send him an email.

As for the pump, in the event the AAZ engine I have is the stock pump, would I be better off sourcing a different pump, to achieve my slight power increase? By the reading I've done and responses received, a built m-tdi pump, rover pump, or 4bt pump would be the best routes to pursue?

Reply #8January 17, 2022, 03:46:19 pm

Chuck1978

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2022, 03:46:19 pm »
Any updates on this?
That hybrid turbo will fit those engines, but the manifold or other things may need swapped or altered to fit.
There are better turbos to use however, like the Holset HE200WG or smaller HE150WG/HE201W.

Reply #9May 05, 2022, 01:56:26 pm

TukendorfTDI

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2022, 01:56:26 pm »
Yes! I ended up going with an ALH engine.

I bought a brand new Bosch 12mm mechanical pump from a 2.8L VW Euro Transporter. Its a direct bolt-on, and I will be trying out a K14 turbo and manifold. I have one on hand here so I will see how it works out for now. Currently just trying to find some injector nozzles, either Bosio Power Plus 520 nozzles or Bosio 1019

Reply #10July 19, 2022, 04:31:30 pm

Chuck1978

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2022, 04:31:30 pm »
Any updates Tyler?
I'm basically doing the same thing as you, I have several mtdi pumps, the LT2.8, 300TDI, & Kia 2.9TDi. Suzuki Samurai and probably this '88 Toyota 4x4 pickup truck as well getting swapped.
What's a good static timing spec for the LT 2.8 pump? I have read as small as around 0.95mm, or as high as 1.6mm. I'll have to revisit that again.

Reply #11July 20, 2022, 04:10:55 pm

libbydiesel

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Re: 1Z/AHU M-TDI build Toyota Pickup
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2022, 04:10:55 pm »
1.40mm is a good starting point.

 

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