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Author Topic: More on breaking in a new engine  (Read 344 times)

June 11, 2018, 10:37:15 am

Spokerider

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More on breaking in a new engine
« on: June 11, 2018, 10:37:15 am »
Guys,

 The time has come to break in a newly rebuilt aaz.......new pistons, bearings, rings, valves, springs etc, but using the old crank and cam shaft.

 I have read this break-in FAQ, but would still like a little more clarification on the specifics of loading the engine, how long and how much load, and the rpms I need to hit, to CORRECTLY  break in this engine. I have one chance to get it right.
 http://vwdiesel.net/forum/index.php/topic,33755.0.html

  So my questions are......

 1]  Do I let the engine come up to temp [ have the fan cycle on / off once ] gently with no load, and then begin driving it?

 2] Loading the engine.......how long should the "load" runs last at first? 3 or 4 seconds? I have low to moderate hills I can go up and down, about 6 percent grade. I do have some longer hills [ like a full minute to drive up, or longer ] with steeper grades I can drive, but they are 20 mins away from home.

 3] When to begin increasing the duration and steepness of the load runs? After 30 mins of the short loads runs? Longer?

 4] I understand that the negative load is as important as the positive loading of the rings for break in, so coasting down a hill in a gear that allows for engine breaking is good? How often do I need to do negative load runs?

 5] RPM's. After the engine has warmed up, what rpms should I be reaching? Up to 3000 rpm? Up to 4000 rpm? Short bursts or?

 6] Cooling of the rings / engine between runs......is this achieved by gentle driving for a period of time? If so, for how long to "cool" the engine before doing another loading run?

 7] How long should this first driving session last? And what about subsequent driving sessions? Longer than the first? An hour? Less / more?

  My rig is a samurai, heavier than stock, lower gears and 33" tires. Engine is bone stock aaz, Ko3, no fuel mods [ yet ]. Loading the engine will come easier with this weight and gearing vs a jetta or golf.

 Thanks for your input. As mentioned, I have one chance to do this right.  ;D



 



Reply #1June 13, 2018, 05:40:24 pm

Spokerider

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Re: More on breaking in a new engine
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2018, 05:40:24 pm »


 So am I the only one to ever [ want ] to break in a rebuilt vw diesel??

Reply #2June 14, 2018, 01:35:21 am

Dakotakid

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Re: More on breaking in a new engine
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2018, 01:35:21 am »
No, but it has been kicked to death for decades.
It always ends up with argumentative dead-end threads.

Hand in hand is how you (or whoever) prepared the block and how the rings were oriented on the pistons. I am very fussy. I have engines which run really well for what they are.

After assembling an engine, I will fire it up a few short (less than a minute) times to simply check to see if it is leaking oil somewhere. At that point, I don't give two sheets if it is smoking or not or whatever.....because it is smoking and huffing and puffing to some extent and, that is normal as far as I am concerned. When initially fired, I will not let it sit there and idle at basement. I will keep it flat rotating  like 1500 or 2000 rpm (not mindlessly revving up and down).

Once I am sure no oil is pouring out or anti-freeze is leaking.....and, after I have loaded tools and walking shoes and cell phone....I take off negotiating back streets on my way to the highway.

I will pull over several times and check for leaks...making sure I don't get run over.

I work on my stuff essentially at the base of an 8 mile gradual uphill toward a very major natl. park. Once I am sure I have no leaks, I will pull up toward the park giving the engine moderate to above moderate pulls for a few seconds and then getting off the throttle. Essentially, exercising the rings and introducing them to the cylinder walls.

I will NOT pull full bore at any point and I watch the temp gauge very closely. You do not want to pull for an extended period of time and cook your rings. I don't know....it is kind of like push-ups. On again....off again.

With a true bore and my favorite Goetze rings well placed on the piston, I can literally feel the compression increasing as I get close to the park (the 8 miles). I then pull off in the park and check everything again.

I don't spend time setting up a sun dial and over thinking/anal-izing the process. But, I have done this many times...so, it is not like "the first time."

Myself, I generally will run some 10-30 gas oil mixed with some dino 15-40 for the first couple hundred miles. I WANT things to NOT be slippery initially (here come the arguments....yawn).

Just don't over do it with hard pulls and get the rings too hot. And, once you launch on the initial voyage, let the engine gradually warm up to TRUE operating temp.....being a good hot crank and block......not just warm anti-freeze.

I feel certain you will find this non-helpful....so, later, dude.

So much of successful rebuilds depends on how the prep-work was performed. There used to be a very strong contingent of "break-it-in-like-you-stole-it" guys here years ago. Thankfully, they never returned from rehab or moved on.
Keep rocking, Comrade.
Thank you for the uranium deposits, Comrade Clintons.

Reply #3June 14, 2018, 12:01:36 pm

ORCoaster

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Re: More on breaking in a new engine
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2018, 12:01:36 pm »
So much of successful rebuilds depends on how the prep-work was performed. There used to be a very strong contingent of "break-it-in-like-you-stole-it" guys here years ago. Thankfully, they never returned from rehab or moved on.

And when I read the initial post a couple of days ago I was going to tell him the exact line.  OK< back to rehab for me. 

LOL
Now Own 1981 Caddy as the NEW DISTRACTION to all that is around me.  Project Away!

Reply #4June 14, 2018, 06:23:16 pm

Spokerider

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Re: More on breaking in a new engine
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2018, 06:23:16 pm »
No, but it has been kicked to death for decades.
It always ends up with argumentative dead-end threads.

Hand in hand is how you (or whoever) prepared the block and how the rings were oriented on the pistons. I am very fussy. I have engines which run really well for what they are.

After assembling an engine, I will fire it up a few short (less than a minute) times to simply check to see if it is leaking oil somewhere. At that point, I don't give two sheets if it is smoking or not or whatever.....because it is smoking and huffing and puffing to some extent and, that is normal as far as I am concerned. When initially fired, I will not let it sit there and idle at basement. I will keep it flat rotating  like 1500 or 2000 rpm (not mindlessly revving up and down).

Once I am sure no oil is pouring out or anti-freeze is leaking.....and, after I have loaded tools and walking shoes and cell phone....I take off negotiating back streets on my way to the highway.

I will pull over several times and check for leaks...making sure I don't get run over.

I work on my stuff essentially at the base of an 8 mile gradual uphill toward a very major natl. park. Once I am sure I have no leaks, I will pull up toward the park giving the engine moderate to above moderate pulls for a few seconds and then getting off the throttle. Essentially, exercising the rings and introducing them to the cylinder walls.

I will NOT pull full bore at any point and I watch the temp gauge very closely. You do not want to pull for an extended period of time and cook your rings. I don't know....it is kind of like push-ups. On again....off again.

With a true bore and my favorite Goetze rings well placed on the piston, I can literally feel the compression increasing as I get close to the park (the 8 miles). I then pull off in the park and check everything again.

I don't spend time setting up a sun dial and over thinking/anal-izing the process. But, I have done this many times...so, it is not like "the first time."

Myself, I generally will run some 10-30 gas oil mixed with some dino 15-40 for the first couple hundred miles. I WANT things to NOT be slippery initially (here come the arguments....yawn).

Just don't over do it with hard pulls and get the rings too hot. And, once you launch on the initial voyage, let the engine gradually warm up to TRUE operating temp.....being a good hot crank and block......not just warm anti-freeze.

I feel certain you will find this non-helpful....so, later, dude.

So much of successful rebuilds depends on how the prep-work was performed. There used to be a very strong contingent of "break-it-in-like-you-stole-it" guys here years ago. Thankfully, they never returned from rehab or moved on.



 Dakota,
 Thank you for sharing your knowledge, and taking the time to post. Yes, I do find it useful.

 Unfortunately, I do not know 100 % what / how my engine was assembled. I bought it rebuilt in long block fashion from a local vw specialty shop in Vancouver. The builder did assure me that is was assembled with all oem vw parts......no chinese stuff. This was back in 2008 when there was an abundance of aaz parts still available at the vw dealers.

  I did remove the crank to machine the D shaped nose mod, and assembled it all again with new, oem rod bolts and bearing cap bolts.

  Anyway.....back to engine break in...... I understand the benefit to moderate loading of the engine as soon as the engine is fully warmed up. and to warm the engine up gradually. As per the FAQ link that I posted a link to, I plan on decelerating down hills too, under engine compression.

 It is the duration of these break in trips that I was unsure of, in the context of heat cycling of the engine. I see that you do an 8 mile hill, and back home again? Is that it for the 1st day break in? What about the next trip? Same 8 mile run and back home?

 I have 15/40 dino oil in it now, and plan to use it for the 1st 500 miles, then fresh dino oil and filter.

  Thanks for advice.

 

Reply #5June 14, 2018, 11:42:37 pm

RunninWild

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Re: More on breaking in a new engine
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2018, 11:42:37 pm »
I don't  believe you need many short trips to break it in properly, the engine just needs rotations to wear together. As per the manual in my new chevy cruze diesel, drive it normally but try not to push the rpms too high, don't engine break and don't hold a specific rpm for any significant amount of time and avoid idling.

Reply #6June 15, 2018, 12:01:36 pm

Dakotakid

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Re: More on breaking in a new engine
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2018, 12:01:36 pm »
^^What he sez.
Remember, you are introducing surfaces to surfaces not only on/in the cylinder walls, but the main and crank bearings as well. Everybody gets accustomed to one-another and some modifications are made to produce full surface load bearing.

Of course, I don't believe anyone is going to resist the urge to roll it on full bore before too long....believe me....I can't. But, you need to keep these bursts short to not build up heat and score/destroy the bearing surfaces.

Just keep watching the temp...looking for leaks and smoke and do yer best.....as the intelligent and beautiful first lady sez, "....Be BEST!"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUmZp8pR1uc

That young lady was one of our very here on the little insignificant Isle. I used old pie pan tins to record her using a #6 nail using my gopher running in a coffee can for power. Loved to listen to these recordings in my Vauxall XR7j-ab which rendered 56 miles to the gallon....Imperial of course.......
« Last Edit: June 15, 2018, 12:37:27 pm by Dakotakid »
Keep rocking, Comrade.
Thank you for the uranium deposits, Comrade Clintons.

 

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